Hit or Miss: Tesla Model Y

Model Y

Tesla just released their new entry into the crossover SUV space. The model Y completes the Tesla S-3-X-Y lineup and rounds off a complete package of vehicles of all styles for the modern buyer.
Upon first seeing the model y I was confused how it was different from the model 3. I mean it almost quite literally looks exactly the same. At certain camera angles there appears to be no or minimal size differences, however that is untrue, and the Y is actually a bit larger than the 3. Also, one of the first things I noticed was the amount of people piling out this thing. It was like a clown car. Turns out the new model Y is an optional 7-seater, which while cool in theory may not be so great if you try to fit someone back there. It seems like 3rd row passengers will need to be small children or have no legs because I can’t imagine there’s any substantial leg or head room. Overall the model Y is very Tesla. Pano roof, large screen display, minimalist interior, optional auto pilot etc. One of the big hurdles Tesla faced with the Model 3 was production. Elon Musk during the unveiling brought up several times how the most difficult aspect of a car company is mass production. Well Tesla seems to have done their best to solve that problem by literally mix and matching components from the Model 3 and Model X. A lot of the body panels and body lines I’d be willing to bet are interchangeable. The interiors are all identical and many of the main components are more than likely the same….and I’m really not sure how I feel about all this. I think it’s really smart from a business and manufacturing standpoint. But from consumer standpoint it leaves much to be desired. If there’s something you don’t like about say the model3, you’re going to have a tough time getting away from that when you move over to a Model Y or Model X. There’s just not much option other than the size differences. I would be super interested to know what exactly is the same. Someone should go through the parts backend and probably half of the parts catalog is matching part numbers with the other models. From an appearance standpoint I’m not a fan of the direction Tesla has gone with both the Model 3 and Model Y. The plain smooth front while modern, seems strange to me. I like how the Model S and Model X at least have a small semblance of a grill with an emblem. Otherwise the profile is very classic and smooth. The interior sticks to the minimalist styling of Tesla. Large infotainment screen that controls everything, same seats as the Model 3, overall very clean and classy. All that being said, I’m still a huge fan of Tesla and I think this vehicle will do extremely well. For the U.S. market it covers all the size and spec requirements a consumer wants in a crossover and it doesn’t have any of the gimmicks of the Model X that make it seem flamboyant. At its very essence, it’s just a car and nothing out of the ordinary. Priced in at around $47k to start and dropping to $39k for the base model standard range expected to release in spring 202,1 it’s in a very good sweet spot for its competition and may raise an eyebrow on a buyer who might otherwise not consider s Tesla at all.

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